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Cisco Defense Orchestrator

About Certificates

Digital certificates provide digital identification for authentication. A digital certificate includes information that identifies a device or user, such as the name, serial number, company, department, or IP address. A digital certificate also includes a copy of the public key for the user or device. Certificates are used for SSL (Secure Socket Layer), TLS (Transport Layer Security), and DTLS (Datagram TLS) connections, such as HTTPS and LDAPS.

You can create the following types of certificate:

  • Internal certificates—Internal identity certificates are certificates for specific systems or hosts. You can generate these yourself using the OpenSSL toolkit or get them from a Certificate Authority. You can also generate a self-signed certificate. 

The system comes with the following pre-defined internal certificates, which you can use as is or replace: DefaultInternalCertificate and  DefaultWebServerCertificate

  • Internal Certificate Authority (CA) certificates—Internal CA certificates are certificates that the system can use to sign other certificates. These certificates differ from internal identity certificates with respect to the basic constraints extension and the CA flag, which are enabled for CA certificates but disabled for identity certificates. You can generate these yourself using the OpenSSL toolkit or get them from a Certificate Authority. You can also generate a self-signed internal CA certificate. If you configure self-signed internal CA certificates, the CA runs on the device itself.

The system comes with the following pre-defined internal CA certificate, which you can use as is or replace: NGFW-Default-InternalCA

  • Trusted Certificate Authority (CA) certificates—A trusted CA certificate is used to sign other certificates. It is self-signed and called a root certificate. A certificate that is issued by another CA certificate is called a subordinate certificate.

Certificate Authorities (CAs) are trusted authorities that “sign” certificates to verify their authenticity, thereby guaranteeing the identity of the device or user. CAs issue digital certificates in the context of a PKI, which uses public-key or private-key encryption to ensure security. A CA can be a trusted third party, such as VeriSign, or a private (in-house) CA that you establish within your organization. CAs are responsible for managing certificate requests and issuing digital certificates. 

The system includes many trusted CA certificates from third party Certificate Authorities. These are used by SSL decryption policies for Decrypt Re-Sign actions.

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